DAVScan – Fingerprints Servers, Finds Exploits & Scans WebDAV

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DAVScan is a quick and lightweight webdav scanner designed to discover hidden files and folders on DAV enabled webservers. The scanner works by taking advantage of overly privileged/misconfigured WebDAV servers or servers vulnerable to various disclosure or authentication bypass vulnerabilities. The scanner attempts to fingerprint the target server and then spider the server based on the results of a root PROPFIND request.

Features

  • Server header fingerprinting – If the webserver returns a server header, davscan can search for public exploits based on the response.
  • Basic DAV scanning with PROPFIND – Quick scan to find anything that might be visible from DAV.
  • Unicode Auth Bypass – Works using GET haven’t added PROPFIND yet. Not fully tested so double check the work.
  • Exclusion of DoS exploit results – You can exclude denial of service exploits from the searchsploit results.
  • Exclusion of MSF modules from exploit results – Custom searchsploit is included in the repo for this. Either overwrite existing searchsploit or backup and replace. This feature may or may not end up in the real searchsploit script.

 

Help & Output

usage: davscan.py [-h] -H HOST [-p PORT] [-a AUTH] [-u USER] [-P PASSWORD] [-o OUTFILE] [-d ] [-m ]
-H HOST, --host HOST hostname or IP address of web server; -h foo.com
optional arguments:
-h, --help show this help message and exit
-p PORT, --port PORT port to connect to the host on (defaults to port 80); -p 80
-a AUTH, --auth AUTH Basic authentication required; -a basic
-u USER, --user USER user; -u derp
-P PASSWORD, --password PASSWORD password for user; -P 'hunter2'
-o OUTFILE, --out OUTFILE output file. defaults to /tmp/davout; -o /foo/bar
-d, --no-dos exclude DoS results from searchploit.
-m, --no-msf exclude MSF modules from results.

 

Download now – DAVScan

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