Apple’s Watch Sparks Privacy Controversy Before Actually Being Available

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The Apple Watch just launched last week, and even if it won’t be made available for purchase just yet (it’s coming in 2015), the device is already raising a lot of eyebrows security-wise.The Watch’s real-life appearance comes in the wake of the hacked celebrity photos form the iCloud scandal, so it’s no wonder people are asking a lot of questions.

Notably, Connecticut Attorney General George Jespen has published a letter on the State of Connecticut governmental website asking a bunch of plausible questions.He also requests a meeting with Apple representatives to discuss how information on the Apple Watch will be kept safe from curious eyes.

In the letter, Jaspen highlights several areas of concern. For starters, he wants to know where the information collected by the wearable will be stored. Will it reside on the Apple Watch itself or will it go on its servers? If the latter scenario is the case, how will the information be kept private?

Furthermore, Apple needs a strategy to review application privacy policies so that users’ health information is protected. Jaspen wants to find out how the Cupertino tech giant plans to do that.

However, on a closer look, we find that some of Japsen’s questions have already been answered by Apple’s Review Guidelines for developers of the HealthKit APIs.

In the document, Apple states that “The health-related info collected from users won’t be stored in the iCloud and apps attempting to take advantage of this method of storage won’t be granted the green light”.

Furthermore, it says that apps will be unable to share private info with third-parties without the user’s consent. Last but not least, apps that claim to be able to diagnose or offer treatment solutions will be not taken into consideration.

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