Home Cyber Security News Vulnerability In ABUS Secvest Connected Alarms Allowed Remote Disabling

Vulnerability In ABUS Secvest Connected Alarms Allowed Remote Disabling

by Abeerah Hashim
ABUS Secvest alarms vulnerability

The connected home alarm systems from German security firm ABUS had a serious security issue. Researchers found a vulnerability in ABUS Secvest alarms that could allow an attacker to disable the alarm system remotely. This would potentially leave the users – homes or businesses – vulnerable to thefts.

ABUS Secvest Alarms Vulnerability

Security researchers from the cybersecurity firm Eye Security found a serious vulnerability in ABUS Secvest alarms allowing remote attacks.

As elaborated in their blog post, the vulnerability existed because of improper authentication of requests reaching its HTTPS interface for disabling alarms.

Though, some login requests had limitations on guessing credentials. However, exploiting other requests could let an adversary extract details about the alarm system user. As stated in the post,

Although the HTTPS request to deactivate the system requires authentication, many other requests do not. For example the sec_about_panel.cgi script can be accessed without logging in, giving a summary of the system including the number of sensors, locks etc. The sec_virtkeypad_raster.bmp file gives an attacker a live view of the alarm system screen, allowing him to see the system name and if the alarm is on or off…

Also, an attacker, without signing in, could easily test sirens, download system configuration, or extract login credentials. Having the usernames and passwords then gives the attacker complete control over the alarm system.

The downloaded configuration file would also include the password for dynamic DNS ABUS server. This poses even more threats to the victim

By taking over the dynamic DNS, we can redirect the users to our own IP address and start manipulating information. We could for example tell the app that the alarm system is active, while in reality it is turned off. Also, if the user has cameras, we could manipulate the video stream. We can now record a bit of video and play it over and over, so for the end-user, everything looks normal while we are breaking in.

Patch Deployed – Update Asap!

The researchers found the security flaw in late 2020, following which, they reach out to ABUS. Specifically, they found the bug, CVE-2020-28973, in the Secvest FUAA50000 alarm system.

Following their report, ABUS developed a patch and released it with firmware version 3.01.21.

Despite that the patch is out, the researchers noticed only 10% of the systems running the latest firmware version. That means a vast majority of Secvest FUAA50000 alarms remain vulnerable.

Therefore, all users must ensure updating their alarm systems at the earliest to avoid potential mishaps.

This report simply adds to the growing IoT security concerns. As more and more device makers jump on this bandwagon without taking care of cybersecurity (we now have internet-connected air fryers as well), the technology is simply increasing the attack surface risking the users.

Smart tech firms should vigilantly monitor every device that connects to the internet for security flaws. Whereas, the users should also make sure to keep every gadget in their connected home up-to-date.

You may also like

Latest Hacking News

Privacy Preference Center

Necessary

The __cfduid cookie is used to identify individual clients behind a shared IP address and apply security settings on a per-client basis.

cookie_notice_accepted and gdpr[allowed_cookies] are used to identify the choices made from the user regarding cookie consent.

For example, if a visitor is in a coffee shop where there may be several infected machines, but the specific visitor's machine is trusted (for example, because they completed a challenge within your Challenge Passage period), the cookie allows Cloudflare to identify that client and not challenge them again. It does not correspond to any user ID in your web application, and does not store any personally identifiable information.

__cfduid, cookie_notice_accepted, gdpr[allowed_cookies]

Advertising

DoubleClick by Google refers to the DoubleClick Digital Marketing platform which is a separate division within Google. This is Google’s most advanced advertising tools set, which includes five interconnected platform components.

DoubleClick Campaign Manager: the ad-serving platform, called an Ad Server, that delivers ads to your customers and measures all online advertising, even across screens and channels.

DoubleClick Bid Manager – the programmatic bidding platform for bidding on high-quality ad inventory from more than 47 ad marketplaces including Google Display Network.

DoubleClick Ad Exchange: the world’s largest ad marketplace for purchasing display, video, mobile, Search and even Facebook inventory.

DoubleClick Search: is more powerful than AdWords and used for purchasing search ads across Google, Yahoo, and Bing.

DoubleClick Creative Solutions: for designing, delivering and measuring rich media (video) ads, interactive and expandable ads.

doubleclick

Analytics

The _ga is asssociated with Google Universal Analytics - which is a significant update to Google's more commonly used analytics service. This cookie is used to distinguish unique users by assigning a randomly generated number as a client identifier. It is included in each page request in a site and used to calculate visitor, session and campaign data for the sites analytics reports. By default it is set to expire after 2 years, although this is customisable by website owners.

The _gat global object is used to create and retrieve tracker objects, from which all other methods are invoked. Therefore the methods in this list should be run only off a tracker object created using the _gat global variable. All other methods should be called using the _gaq global object for asynchronous tracking.

_gid works as a user navigates between web pages, they can use the gtag.js tagging library to record information about the page the user has seen (for example, the page's URL) in Google Analytics. The gtag.js tagging library uses HTTP Cookies to "remember" the user's previous interactions with the web pages.

_ga, _gat, _gid